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13/09/2016 - 6 High-Paying Jobs That Are Great for Career Changers

 By Stacey Gawronski

Have you heard? Changing careers is totally in. Gone are the days of holding one job in a professional lifetime. Unlike your parents who may have worked at one company for decades, you’re less likely to stick to the same job—or even the same career or industry—for the long haul. And the good news is, you don’t have to.

These days, career changing is becoming just as common as job hopping (although, here at The Muse, we like to refer to it as career building), and depending on what field you’re interested in transitioning into, you may be able to make the jump without too much blood, sweat, and tears. While some popular second careers may require a specific degree and credentials (nursing comes to mind), there are plenty of other roles that people with a variety of backgrounds can transition into with a splash of business savvy and a peppering of skill building. Check out the six high-paying options below.

1. Data Scientist
It turns out that not only is data science a lucrative job (we’re talking a national salary average of $118K, according to Glassdoor, with the minimum a healthy $76K), it’s also a broad one. Because data science (a relatively new title and function), can be divided up into several different roles—data engineering, data research, data visualization, and more—there’s a decent chance that your background relates to the field in some way. Whether you’re an engineering major, a former graphic designer, or someone on the business side who’s taken an interest in analytics, if you know what kind of position to look for within the crazy-growing industry, you’ve already got a leg up.

Plus, because it’s such an unmoored opportunity, if you get in now, chances for success are huge. According to one data scientist I spoke with, knowing what you can do for the company (especially if the organization isn’t exactly sure what it wants or needs) can give you the edge you need. All you need to do is have the background to support your ideas, and, well, if you’re not sure you have that, look into bootcamps, part-time classes, or workshops from companies like Byte Academy. These outfit you with the skills you need and can give you access to a strong network and career guidance. The most enticing part is that you won’t even necessarily have to quit your job and drain your savings to attend grad school.

2. Social Media Manager
Love using innovative mediums like Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Facebook, and Pinterest to tell compelling stories? Are you devoted to building your personal brand and cultivating a strong following—and an even stronger community? Have you always loved witty remarks and writing the perfect click-able sentence? Want to get paid for it? Well then, this could be the new job you didn’t even know you were looking for. While not all social media managers start out making the big bucks, salaries in the major markets can reach six figures. And as the need for influential leaders in this arena continues to increase, so too will the average salary. In many industry circles, you’re nothing without your social media strategy, and companies big and small realized this yesterday.

The first step in breaking into this field is making sure your personal social accounts are up to par. Of course, being a good social media manager is about more than getting likes on your personal vacation photos; pay attention to companies’ social media strategies, homing in on what’s working and what they could do better.

Better yet, look for opportunities to volunteer to manage the social accounts of nonprofits or small businesses for a few months—many organizations could use the help, and it will give you experience outside of your own profiles to talk about. Use your findings and analysis to help you make the move and show companies why you’d be a great fit for the job.

3. Fundraiser
Nonprofits, educational institutions, hospitals, and the like need money to survive—and are willing to pay nicely for someone with the skills to bring in the bills. According to the Association of Fundraising Professionals, the middle ground salary can range from $65K-$75K, but that range says nothing of top-tier fundraisers who can clock in at half a million or more, according to an analysis by The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Convincing people to give generously is obviously a huge part of the job, so having a background in sales or marketing can be impactful as you attempt to transition into this field. That said, fundraisers also must be able to build relationships to recruit volunteers and donors, manage donor accounts, make financial projections, manage multi-layered projects ranging from large campaigns to donor events, and ultimately communicate the core message of the organization and inspire people to help. It sounds like a lot, but there’s a good chance you already have these skills from past jobs, volunteer work, or even extracurriculars. For example, your graduate school leadership role managing volunteers for the quarterly clothing drives can speak to your experience in recruiting and carrying out a mission.

And of course, make sure you believe in—and show your passion for—the mission of the organization you’re applying to. If you can’t convey this to interviewers, how will you be able to convince donors?

Read more at: The Muse


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